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Class of 1966...



Dr. Gallagher announces a $50 million construction program to build new cafeterias, office space, classrooms, and a theater. The Technology and Administration building and Cohen Library are the first new structures since 1930. The Board of Education anticipates a $21 million expansion of the undergraduate faculties, and $40.5 million for graduate growth, under its “Long Range Plan for the City University of New York.” The 1963-64 basketball season was marred by the tragic and sudden death of Sophomore Mike Schaffer. During his Freshman year, Schaffer was a leading scorer. Schaffer was killed in a hit-and-run incident, just hours after he led the Beavers to an easy 74-44 triumph over Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. In the Fall of 1963, the great bell at Shepard Hall rang in October, in memory of six African-American children killed in the bombing of a Birmingham, Alabama church. The bell also rang forty-six times; one for each year that John F. Kennedy lived. A memorial service is held in his honor, in the Great Hall, led by President Gallagher. 6,000 students protest against Governor Rockefeller for free tuition. A letter writing campaign and a rally are staged for the free tuition front. 500 City University students join 1500 others from the City and State Universities. Professor Kenneth B. Clarke (Psychology) was the top African-American educator in the state, and the first African-American on the 15 member board of Regents, in its 182 years in history. Chancellor Bowker and the presidents of the colleges announced that they would support a university-wide tuition charge. Subsequently, Chancellor Bowker and Dean of Studies Levy resign. Presidents Meng and Gideonse retire after Chairman Gustave G. Rosenberg of the Board of Higher Education demanded, “Undivided fealty on the part of all its officers of administration.” A blackout paralyzed the Northeast. A bus and subway strike also left New Yorkers stranded. The Campus suspended publication in a dispute with its printer and student government. Dean Morton Gottschall, of the College of Liberal Arts and Science retired in February, after continued service since his own graduation in 1913. The Student Council calls for the abolition of the House Un-American Activities. Visitors to the campus include: Robert Morgenthau, Louis Lefkowitz, Pulitzer Prize Winner Archibald Macleish, and Jamaican Prime Minister Sir Alexander Bustamente.



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